Tag Archives: vintage guitar

Mike Landis’ Very Special 1966 Jaguar: A Holiday Tale Spanning Two Decades

Happy Holidays from all of us at Mike & Mike’s Guitar Bar. We truly would be nothing if not for the love, support, and business of our many friends and customers. Cheers to you! In celebration of this joyous time, I’d like to tell you about something extraordinary that happened to me recently, something I couldn’t talk about because it would have spoiled a surprise.

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This 1966 Jaguar belongs to the father of my good friend Mike Landis, and it happens to be the very first offset guitar I ever encountered. I haven’t seen it in 20 years.

I vividly remember Mike pulling it out of the case on some otherwise average day in 1996. I’d never seen anything like it before—like something out of a Sci-Fi dream. The cold gleam of the Jaguar’s many control plates ignited within my young mind what felt like a fumbling musical adolescence; I didn’t know what I’d do with it if I had one, I just knew I needed it.

Sunglasses case, no less!

Sunglasses case, no less!

Holding that guitar for a brief moment two decades ago felt like some guilty, illicit pleasure. Everything inside me knew I shouldn’t have been messing with it, but the rush of getting caught made it all the more thrilling. I strummed a few chords, ignorant to the function of the switches, yet marveling at its beauty and quality of the sound I was hearing. It was clear to me then that I wasn’t worthy of such a guitar.

When Mike heard that I was coming back to my hometown of York, PA for a quick visit, he asked if I’d be able to get it back into playing shape as a Christmas gift for his dad. Of course I said yes!

That night as I stood over the guitar—the guitar—I paused for a moment before I dared touch it. I thought back to that first trespass, handling his dad’s Jaguar as if it were a priceless artifact, caught up in wonder and amazement. Surely, at that time, it had been the nicest instrument I had ever seen, let alone played. I wondered, was I worthy of it yet? I breathed, spoke aloud a quick thank you to any deity that may have been listening, and got to work. For two hours, I attended to it with the same thoughtful, careful attitude I try to lend to every instrument.

fullsizerender_1Before I arrived, Mike gave me a run-down of what the guitar might need. For starters, he wasn’t getting any sound out of the thing, and my first thought was that the Rhythm Circuit switch may have a bad solder joint. When I finally got my hands on it, the solder joints didn’t look obviously inoperable, but I thought it a safe bet to simply reflow a few key joints. This certainly helped, and suddenly I was getting sound from the Lead Circuit, with intermittent functionality of the RC.

It took a few minutes of turning the Rhythm volume and tone controls, but it turned out that those pots were just so dirty from disuse that they wouldn’t pass signal. Ideally, I’d have sprayed them out with contact cleaner, but alas, this was one thing I forgot to mention when I sent Mike my laundry list of tools I’d need to do the work. They cleaned up beautifully just by being turned over and over, and I told Mike to get some cleaner before too long.

Back in 1996, I remember asking why Mike’s dad never seemed to play the thing. The complaint then was that it just didn’t play all that great, and that was still a problem today. I don’t think the guitar had ever been set up, at least, not by someone that understands the intricacies of Fender Offset Guitars. Strung with too-light strings and with the bridge too high and saddles set at the wrong radius, it was clear that this guitar hadn’t been comfortable to play for ages.

fullsizerender_2I took the strings off, removed the bridge, and gave the guitar a thorough cleaning, from finish to frets. It wasn’t filthy by any means, but the frets showed signs of disuse and the finish had a dull shine. It’s Christmas, after all; this should feel like an entirely new guitar. After a good polish of the finish and frets, and some lemon oil for the rosewood fretboard, this guitar came right back to life.

I had Mike pick up a set of 11 gauge strings, which is usually the lightest I’ll recommend for Jaguars. I lowered and pre-radiused the saddles by eye and re-installed the bridge, intending to fine-tune it later on. To my surprise, the guitar actually played pretty well with just that done, but I decided to give the truss rod another quarter-turn to really dial in the relief. With 11s and the correct amount of neck angle, those strings weren’t going anywhere.

Because the guitar just wasn’t staying in tune before I started my work, I paid special attention to every point of contact on the strings, lubricating the nut and making sure it was properly cut for the gauge being used. Ideally, I’d like to replace the nut on this one at some point, but there just wasn’t time for that on this quick trip home. Another day, then! The trem was also wildly out of adjustment, so I zeroed in on the sweet spot for both the Trem Lock to work as intended and for optimum string tension, and the whole guitar snapped right back in to perfect functionality. Bam!

fullsizerender_3When I was finished, I hovered above the thing, not quite sure how to feel. This was the guitar from my youth that elicited such passion, though my ignorance kept me from fully embracing the model. I couldn’t believe that I was able to give back, as it were, to that first Jaguar. I dreamed about this shimmering blue guitar for years, and here I was, ready to play it as it should always have been. And play, I did; the sound, the feel, the response… it was magical.

Life has come full-circle, in a way. What an honor it was to care for this instrument! Thanks, Mike!

 

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To Mod or Not To Mod…

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…that is the question
Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous guitar tone
Or to take arms against percieved troubles
And by opposing end them.

In the opening phrase of Act III of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, the titular character weighs in on death and suicide, the unfairness of life, and whether one is any better than the other. Likely the most quoted phrase in existence, The Bard’s universally famous question has been repeated, adapted, chopped up, parodied, and revered in innumerable ways since the great tragedy was written in or around the year 1600.

And so, in a flash of utter predictability, I’ve tweaked those first six lines to fit today’s musings, and to be honest, I think it works. The despondent prince was, in essence, comparing life and death, wondering if one had merit over the other. And when we’re modding guitars, it sometimes feels so dire, does it not?

The Heart-ache, and the thousand Natural shocks That Flesh is heir to

When customers write, call, or visit me to ask what I think of their proposed modifications, it’s an exciting prospect no matter what we end up deciding. Instruments are an intensely personal thing for musicians, so the idea that we can easily take a guitar you like and turn it into one you’ll love is why this world is so fun. Like all things, mods have their place, and can be just the thing to rejuvenate your creativity.

True, guitarists are fickle, and what works on Tuesday may be the complete wrong thing come Friday. You may have a friend that tried out a new pickup over the weekend, and blazed through the honeymoon phase and went straight on into divorce. Or take my friend, who bought that expensive boutique speaker for his Princeton and later told me, “I tried to convince myself that I liked that thing.”

I actually really like the mods done to this '70s Les Paul Recording. Many players hated the low-impedance pickups, and those brass plates look particularly good, says I.

I actually really like the mods done to this ’70s Les Paul Recording. Many players hated the low-impedance pickups, and those brass plates look particularly good, says I.

Another good friend toured with a big-time act as tech and tells the story of a night when the guitarist decided that his fuzz pedal didn’t sound right, so he asked for the spare to be put in its place. He played it for sound check, decided he didn’t like it, and had the tech replace it with the third spare, only there was never a third, so the tech put the original back in line. Immediately the response was, “Oh yeah, YEAH, that’s the one!”

And that’s how we are, including myself. From my extensive and incredibly scientific studies, I know that it takes me exactly 0.00359 seconds after performing a mod to start researching other options, even if I love what I’ve come up with. Is this due to the quest for tone we often talk about, or perhaps an inner dissatisfaction that lurks within my being? Perhaps it boils down to musicians being such staunch individualists. No matter the cause, it’s not so surprising that we’re looking for the next new thing as soon as the old new thing is, well, old.

So, when it comes to mods, whether the concept is a passing phase or a long-held belief, it’s good to have a measure of sobriety when considering chopping up your main squeeze. Here are a few things I like to consider before modding:

To sleep, perchance to Dream; aye, there’s the rub

So you have a killer idea to finally achieve that sound in your head. Great! Sleep on it, do some research, seek out demos or schematics, should they apply. Consult a friend, a tech, or the internet. Gather as much information as you possibly can so you’re making an informed decision.

Like all projects worth undertaking, it’s a good idea to slum around forums and the like to get a feel for the kind of work you’re in for. Has someone done this mod before? With billions of people on planet Earth, chances are, yes, someone has. And though it may fly in the face of individuality, checking up on the errant post to glean insight into your desired modification is encouraged if for no other reason than learning what NOT to do!

There have been a few times when I’ve taken on a project that I’ve never done before where checking out one of my favorite forums lead me to a thread simply entitled “HELP!” that gave me all of the information I needed to ensure a fool-proof installation. From wiring a four-conductor humbucker to routing a new cavity for that fancy tremolo you bought at the guitar show, there’s a lot to learn from folks that learned the hard way.

Thus Conscience does make Cowards of us all

Just like your favorite poncho, it’s good to ask, “Is this reversible?” While it’s not a make-or-break kind of question in most cases, this is a great thing to mull over before you pick up your screwdriver or Dremel. There’s no sense in utterly ruining your favorite guitar just because you wanted something different, especially with the glut of aftermarket parts out there these days.

In most cases, things like pickups are totally reversible and really only mean resoldering some connections. No big deal. Swapping necks, similar parts, bridges, all of that is totally fine and you should do it. There are a few cases where I’d caution against such things, and usually that’s when we get into the pristine vintage guitar realm.

Or take this old Gibson SG-1 that I modified for a neck pickup for a customer. Neither desirable nor rare, these guitars are ripe for mods.

Or take this old Gibson SG-1 that I modified for a neck pickup for a customer. Neither desirable nor rare, these guitars are ripe for mods.

If you’re modding, say, a Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster, go for it! There are so many of those guitars out there that routing for Wide Range pickups or adding one behind the bridge isn’t going to matter or affect the value in any appreciable way. For a $200 guitar, they’re perfect for this application, and I can tell you that they’re solid testbeds, having worked on more than a few. I also have very little problem doing the above to Fender AVRI guitars, again, because they’re plentiful. Unless you’re thinking of selling your black ’62 Jaguar reissue, don’t feel too bad about omitting the rhythm circuit or slamming some lipstick pickups in there.

If, however, you have a 100% original 1958 Jazzmaster but you really think it needs humbuckers and a Floyd Rose, I’ll probably champion the cause of the unspoiled instrument in front of me rather than simply agreeing and getting out my router.

I’m reminded of a customer we had last year that owned an absolutely mint ’65 Fender Mustang in Sonic Blue. I mean, this was an absolutely untouched, beautiful instrument in every respect. The customer, however, didn’t like blue, and asked if I would refinish it in red. That was one of the few jobs I flat-out declined, and instead suggested we should sell the instrument and acquire either a red one in like condition (for about the same price, too) or buy a guitar that had been mucked with, and refinish that one to the desired color. Eventually, we did the latter, and as far as I know, he ended up being really happy with the new guitar.

In my view, there’s no reason to carve up an immaculate instrument when there are literally thousands of already modded and refinished vintage guitars out there. Sure, things like sound, feel, and playability come into play here, but those things can usually be addressed rather easily. When it comes to devaluing an aged instrument, I try to think a few decades ahead and wonder what I’d think of myself for doing so. That solves more than a few problems.

Of course, if your old friend has been refinished, routed for humbuckers, missing its original guard and decal… then it’s either a good candidate for restoration, or you should do all of those mods you’ve been thinking of! Me, I’m always on the lookout for a cheap, routed-out, refinished ’63 Jaguar that I can do my own thing with.

Also worth mentioning: sometimes you don’t have to do anything drastic to your guitar, what with pickup makers like Curtis Novak putting Mosrite pickups, PAFs, Wide Range humbuckers and Gold Foils in more familiar bobbins.

How about this poor '60s Mustang we adopted last year?

How about this poor ’60s Mustang we adopted last year?

The insolence of Office

When I hear someone say, “It works for ____ so it’s good enough for me,” I tend to worry just a little bit. Not because the proposed mod is a bad idea, but that statement has a lot more going on than the speaker may realize.

Big-name guitarists can get what they want, generally speaking. When you have connections at your favorite guitar company, a dedicated tech or two, and the money to back up your whims, a lot of mods inevitably start to happen. Sure, there’s nothing wrong with swapping pickups in favor of something that suits your needs, but I’ve seen enough modified instruments to know that not every idea is a good one.

A modded '70s Telecaster bass used by studio musician Buell Neidlinger.

A modded ’70s Telecaster bass used by studio musician Buell Neidlinger.

One of the things that often separates the average musician and the touring pro is that they have an army of techs at their disposal, paid well (I hope) to swap those pickups, change out bridges, and glue splintered wood back together on the quick so the show can go on. Some things work, and some things don’t, while others require a lot of attention to keep in check.

I know of one such touring pro that had his tech quickly install a brass nut on his instrument, searching for that brighter sound he craved. When I worked on the guitar some time later, I discovered that the nut slots weren’t cut properly, so the strings were binding up, causing tuning problems. Obviously, this wasn’t ideal. 

The thing is, the player never noticed it, because he never played solos or bent strings, only big chords. He didn’t know about the problem his guitar had because he had a tech to tune it between songs!

The Undiscovered [Flavor] Country

That kind of sounds like a Shakespearean cigarette ad, doesn’t it?

Though this article may sound cautious, please don’t take it as a strict warning against figuring out that sound in your head. At most, I’m just offering a few thoughts to help the potential guitar modder some guidance. What matters most is that you’re happy with the instrument you’re using, and if a cool mod gets you there, then it’s a good one. Some mods might be more effective and less intrusive than others, but there is merit in tweaking a design to work for you.

The old adage “You won’t know until you try” certainly applies. So I say, go for it! But maybe have a good think about it first.

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Demystifying the Fender Jazzmaster and Jaguar Pt. 4: Pickup Lines

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Of all of the things that cause confusion about these guitars, perhaps the most common misconceptions about Jazzmasters (and to a lesser extent, the Jaguar) surround the pickups. Because they’re so odd-looking and unfamiliar, people have all kinds of crazy ideas about what exactly is going on under the cover. I mean, it’s not often that most players have occasion to dismantle a vintage Jazzmaster guitar for the sake of exploration, so the befuddlement is understandable.

You know what’s not helping, though? Fender. God bless ‘em for introducing more and more models these days with non-standard pickup complements – a qualified win for modders and players seeking variety. Their current offerings are rife with sounds not normally associated with offset guitars, and for all of the faults a few of them have, Fender’s really woken up to the notion that offset guitars are cool. This is good.

Because Fender’s introducing so many new models with different pickups, the result is that there’s more confusion than ever about what you’re actually getting when you buy a Jazzmaster. Single-coils? P-90s? Wide Range Humbuckers? High-output ‘buckers? Yeah, they’re all there now, and some are hidden under Jazzmaster pickup covers. Go to Fender.com and type ‘Jazzmaster’ into the search bar, and you’ll get an army of models that have little in common with one another save for the body shape. Holy hell! How’s a girl or guy to keep all of that straight?!

In this article, we’ll try to do away with some of the misinformation and show you exactly what’s under the hood in both the Jazzmaster and Jaguar as well as some of the variations you’ll find out there in the marketplace. We’ll also dive in to some definitions and specifics so that you can make an informed choice when you go to buy your next offset guitar.

A shot of Mojotone's Jazzmaster bobbin

Compare this shot of Mojotone’s Jazzmaster pickup with that of the Strat pickup below.

Open Coils

The Jazzmaster pickup is a true single-coil pickup. From start to finish, these units are made of one coil of wire turned around the pole pieces, and in principle works just like those found on Fender’s more popular models, the Stratocaster and Telecaster. The construction of Jazzmaster pickups does have some notable differences when compared to other more common single-coil pickups: whereas a Stratocaster pickup is about 7/16” tall and wound tightly to the rod magnets, true Jazzmaster pickups are 1/8” tall and the windings extend nearly to the edge of the 1 1/2” bobbin.mojotone-classic-stratocaster-electric-guitar-pickup-single-strat-

This wider surface area translates to a wider frequency response (since the coil itself covers a far greater area of the string’s vibrational length) and, because the wire travels father with each turn, a hotter pickup. (Jason Lollar does a brilliant job of explaining this on his website) The Jazzmaster unit also uses rod magnets just like a Strat or Tele, differentiating it from a P-90, which it most certainly is not.

Don’t Drop the Soap[bar]

DV019_Jpg_Regular_306915.715_cremeOften, you’ll hear people refer to Jazzmaster pickups as ‘soapbar’ pickups, and they should be forgiven for doing so; that big, white cover certainly has a soapy quality, especially on older models where the covers have a more satin finish than shiny new parts. This really is erroneous as pickup nomenclature goes, as the term began its existence as a way to help distinguish between two varieties of Gibson’s P-90 pickup design of the mid-1940s, the other being the “dog ear” mounting style which is commonly found on Les Paul Jr. and 330/Casino guitar models.

The P-90 “Soapbar” is a P-90 pickup which has a rectangular shape with rounded edges and with both the pickup and mounting screws contained within the coil bobbin. Wikipedia mentions that the nickname probably came about with the introduction of the Les Paul model in ’52, on which the pickup covers were white. These, of course, looked like bars of soap to consumers, and thus the name stuck. (Funnily enough, the Jazzmaster pickup looks more like a bar of soap to me than P-90s, but I digress.)

If we’re just talking about the covers, the Jazzmaster pickup’s very mounting scheme differs from the definition of the term ‘soapbar’, but again, that’s such a slight difference that there’s no shame in having used it. I mean, what matters is what’s inside, not where the screws mount, right?

To be clear, standard Jazzmaster pickups are NOT P-90s in both design and intention: the P-90 uses bar magnets beneath the coil, which magnetizes the pole piece screws and imparts a louder, midrange-focused personality. P-90s are also wound tightly around the bobbin and usually have hotter output, with most vintage examples in the 8-9.3Kohms output range. Jazzmaster pickups use rod magnets, generally live in the 7.4-8.4 range. Not a big difference, but notable.

The louder, dirtier sound of a good P-90 contrasts with the Jazzmaster persona, which has ample yet softened top end and a fatter overall signal with a more thumpy bass response, remaining clear and separated with even the most outrageous fuzz pedal. If adjusted closer to the strings, the Jazzmaster pickup has no problem pushing an amp into overdrive. When it comes to the tone of JM pickups, think more twang than bite, more boom than woof, more punch than kick.

Here’s a  visual reminder to help you tell the difference between these pickups:

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Offset Obfuscation

Adding to the din of confusing specifications are Fender themselves, with more varied offset models than ever. For instance, the Fender Classic Player Jazzmaster might look stock, but it actually does have P-90 pickups hidden beneath Jazzmaster covers. Same goes for the Squier J. Mascis Jazzmaster, a fantastic guitar in its own right. Oh! I almost forgot to mention another offender, the Fender Pawn Shop Bass VI, which looks as though it has a Jazzmaster pickup in the bridge position but it’s actually a humbucker!

As for obvious pickup changes, the Blacktop line of Jazzmasters has a Jazzmaster pickup in the neck paired with a humbucker in the bridge position. Then there’s the Kurt Cobain Jaguar, the Modern Player HH and the Jaguar HH with – you guessed it – dual humbuckers. Additionally, Fender’s Lee Ranaldo signature model comes equipped with re-voiced Wide Range humbuckers. Did I forget anything?

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Oh yeah.

Builders other than Fender are also muddying up the definitions, some offering classic designs with fully-custom options and different pickup layouts that bring more familiar sounds to the offset table. For instance, Fano’s JM-6 model has a stoptail and a TOM style bridge with P90 pickups, much like what you’d expect from a Les Paul. Now, that’s a GREAT guitar, let there be no mistake. I bring this particular guitar up because it’s been handed to me with the attached claim that it’s ‘just like the real thing!’ which isn’t Fano’s intention at all! Man, they make nice stuff…

And, while we highly recommend Japanese-made Fender Jazzmasters as a more cost-effective alternative to their AVRI counterparts, we always recommend swapping out the pickups. Why? Because they’re essentially Strat pickups in an oversized bobbin – just a thin, tall coil the same height as a Strat pickup masquerading as something much, much cooler. These don’t even SOUND like Jazzmaster pickups, and they usually feedback like crazy! Bum deal.

The Creamery shows us the difference!

The Creamery shows us the difference! (the reissue is Japanese)

Sound Decisions

By now it’s become clear to you that there are plenty of “stock” variations between the various models offered from the factory. Luckily, we live in a time where there are more choices than ever when it comes to aftermarket pickups, and more than just brand name. For instance, Jason Lollar offers some of my favorite pickups for the Jazzmaster, and almost every guitar I own has his lovely upgrades installed. Did you know he also has a model of P-90 that’s housed in a Jazzmaster bobbin? It’s loud, authoritative like a good P-90, and has plenty of bite and growl, just like you’d expect from a Les Paul or SG Jr.

Then there’s offset hero Curtis Novak, a man that’s my first stop when I’m on the hunt for something that’s way off the beaten path while retaining a more stock appearance. Sure, he does the tried-and-true Jazzmaster pickup (also a great pickup), but he also creates stranger hybrids that absolutely beg to be played, like the JM-180.

Say you love that hallowed P.A.F. tone? Using dark magick, Novak has stuffed one into that familiar cover, and the result sounds exactly the way you want a vintage Gibson pickup to sound, and the only way you’d know it is that the pole pieces are shifted toward the neck. Maybe you love P-90s, maybe you’re a big fan of Telecaster bridge pickup? Guess what, he does that too! Or, perhaps you’ve been bitten by the DeArmond/Rowe Industries Gold Foil bug, in which case the only prescription is Novak’s Gold Foil-in-JM-housing design. It not only sounds like the best, loudest Gold Foil ever made, but having the gold color poking out of the holes in the pickup cover is like the best little secret you just can’t wait to tell.

If you’re like Other Mike and myself, you have a huge soft spot in your heart for the look and sound of vintage Mosrite guitars, especially the Ventures model. From the way they hang on a strap to that full-yet-springy sound they have when plugged in, to play one is to know the pinnacle of surf-rock coolness. Well, Novak does that, too!

Still confused? If you’ve read this far and are still wondering what the hell a Jazzmaster’s supposed to sound like, check out some sound clips of Lollar, Novak and Seymour Duncan’s amazing Antiquity I and II pickups, as well as those of actual vintage guitars.

For more great options, here are some other manufacturers you should look into: The Creamery, Lindy Fralin, Porter Pickups, and Mojotone.

Jaguar: a Kitteh of a Whole Different Breed

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A rather quick note about Jaguar pickups: they’re far less confusing. Jaguar pickups are a lot like Stratocaster pickups in terms of construction and sound. The main difference is that Jaguar pickups utilize a notched metal surround known as the ‘claw’, which helps eliminate some of the hum associated with single coil pickups. Jaguar pickups are mounted directly to the body, whereas Strat pickups screw to the pickguard.

Jaguars can be much brighter overall than Jazzmasters, which is due in part to the reduced scale length; the Jaguar’s 24” makes for a springier, more twangy sound than the 25.5” standard scale. As aftermarket pickups go, there aren’t as many options for Jaguar users, with most manufacturers making a standard unit and not much else. Novak is one of the few exceptions, offering top-notch Jag replacements, Danelectro-style Lipsticks that drop right in, and even a top-mount version of a Jazzmaster pickup for those looking for a bit more oomph for their chromed-out shortscale.

“Is that a single coil in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?”

Honestly, I wasn’t sure it was even worth getting into all of this; people have been calling JM pickups ‘soapbars’ for ages, and although it’s not really so it may be part of the guitar players’ lexicon, so who am I to try to change it! Still, I believe precise language is important especially when discussing guitar electronics and sounds, and if we’re all on the same page communication will be much easier and we’ll all get a lot more done!

-Michael James Adams

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Getting to Know Mike & Mike’s Guitar Bar

Our good friends at Orbilite Productions came to the shop a month or so back to interview us for what will hopefully become a series of videos detailing just what it is that makes Mike & Mike’s so darn special.

We’re really proud of our first foray into visual media, and we think it came out great! We’re hoping that it shows our personality and helps put a face on the internet presence we’ve been trying to build. Get to know us! Come one, come all!

 

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Mike & Mike’s Guitar Bar at the Spring 2013 Seattle-Tacoma Guitar Show

IMG_7084-impYesterday (May 19, 2013) was the 2013 Seattle-Tacoma Guitar Show at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, and it was a blast! A veritable feast for the eyes for any one even mildly interested in guitars, the Guitar Show is always the perfect way to showcase the dealers, builders, artists and players as well as the fine instruments that inspire the music we connect with on a day-to-day basis.

A Plan, a Van, a Can-Do Attitude

IMG_7078-impFor Mike & Mike’s, the show started well before Sunday. We’d been carefully plotting what we would take with us for the last two weeks, when ol’ Ballsy went on a gear-buying spree using his talent for sniffing out great deals to ensure our having a bevy of beautiful guitars, amps and effects to excite the senses. (Mission accomplished!)

Last week sometime we started really deliberating on the virtues of taking some pieces with us; some were no-brainers on both sides of the spectrum – you know, this goes, that stays – but others were somewhat nebulous. For instance, we have these two massively cool Fender Twin amps, one blackface from ’66 and the other a silverface drip-edge model from ’68. Now, if you don’t know, Twins are great amps but also unwieldy, being as big and heavy as they are. The question: do we really need to bring both? At first it seemed that no, we did not. Last minute though, Mike had a change of heart and there we were, at the show with twin Twins. For the record, I’m glad we took ‘em both! Our table looked quite nice…

When you’re a dealer at the show, it’s always a good idea to get there as early as possible. The loading dock at Meydenbaur usually opens around 6:30, and because there’s only a limited number of hand carts available, the many shops and each of their host of gear translates to a LOT of waiting around. In order to get the jump on the day, we got all of our gear sorted out on Saturday night, and on Sunday morning we packed our rented van at 5:30am shoving off at 6. Not too shabby.

Staking Our Claim

IMG_7085If we’re being honest, setting up our three tables took a good hour at least, not counting carting our belongings to the fourth floor via Meydenbauer’s only service elevator. But the real problem (and biggest time sink) is creating an attractive display that invites wandering eyes to hover – nay, dance – from piece to piece; while it might be easy to simply ‘put out’ guitars in some random fashion, it takes a keen eye to present them in a well-executed, thoughtful way. The three of us brought everything out, and from then on it was a series of friendly, barked opinions which sounded something like “DOES THIS GO HERE” and “I LIKE WHAT YOU’RE DOING PLEASE CONTINUE” and “YOU’RE FIRED”, but only in a j/k sort of way.

As Mike and I later conceded, three tables was exactly the right amount of space for the gear we brought; we didn’t have to stagger any of our instruments, with something like 25 guitars and 5 amps alone, not to mention the other odds and ends we had with us. And did we mention the kick-ass banner our good buddy Jake made for us? Sex appeal to the max, right there.

It Starts

After I was thrice fired and re-hired, the doors opened and the game was afoot, Dear Reader! New friends and potential customers trickled through the door and I’m proud to say that we drew a lot of really great reactions! Also presenting at the show were many of PNW’s guitar elite: Emerald City Guitars, Thunder Road Guitars, Rick King and Guitar Maniacs, amongst others. But for the first time in my life I felt like we were running with the big boys, even drawing the attentive and discerning eye of Jay Boone of Emerald City Guitars, who commented about how impressed he was with the calibre of gear we had with us. From him, that’s a huge compliment!IMG_7089

As the show carried on, it was clear which of our instruments were the stars of our show. Our 1967 Antiqua Fender Coronado, for instance, was the source of many hushed gasps. Also on display was the amp we’ve been calling, “the cleanest Deluxe Reverb on the planet”, a silverface Fender that is downright immaculate, shiny, and perfect. If you were ever curious what old amps looked like when brand new, do take a look at that one at our eBay store!

What was most moving for me personally was the amount of kindness and attention directed toward our stock of Mike & Mike’s Guitar Guards. Nearly every person that dropped by the table, many of whom I’m sure wouldn’t have engaged us otherwise, deliberately stopped to tell us how much they liked the idea of pickguards made from old vinyl records. Many of them took photos, asked how much we charged, how we made them, and if they could send us a particular record. Almost everyone was floored by the idea, and I shook a lot of hands simply because they’d “never thought of it!” Plainly stated, it just felt good to have that little labor of love be recognized on a large scale, and anything that gets our shop that kind of attention is a blessing.

Gear Highlights

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The Teye “La Canastera”

I’m certain that what I thought was cool is going to disappoint most of the guitar lovers around; I don’t have any photos of the ’59 Gibson Les Paul across from our table, nor do I have any of the ’55 Fender Stratocaster adjacent to us either. Both were superb instruments, of course, but what really impressed me this year was the range of gear available. There were plenty of instruments that I’d either never seen before or hadn’t seen in years – things that most guitar buyers might overlook or pass on simply out of ignorance.
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The first thing that caught my eye in the morning was a few tables down from us: a Teye “La Canastera”, an alluring work of art that I’ve only ever seen in magazines. I didn’t dare pick it up, but I really enjoyed being able to glance over at it throughout the day like an especially attractive young thing, too shy to strike up conversation. Honestly, it’s even more beautiful in person. The same vendor – I forgot to ask the name – also had more S-series Teye guitars in stock, including the models adorned in three-dimensional abalone pearl.

IMG_7095Another surprise waiting for me at the show came in the form of two nearly identical Squier Vista Series Jagmasters, one with original pickups and one with replacements. These were guitars I greatly admired when I was in high school, but back then nobody wanted anything to do with the Squier brand, so of course we had no idea how great the guitars of the Vista Series were. I did have occasion to play a sunburst model just as they were released and I loved it, but that headstock decal made me wonder if something was going to go wrong after I bought it. I regret dismissing them so quickly, but seeing these two at the show reminded me how far I’ve come from being the biased idiot I was in high school. (SPOILER ALERT: I’m still pretty biased!)

Winner of the ‘Silliest Bass at the Show’ award was this Pink Floyd-themed Fender Jazz Bass, with airbrushed The Wall graphics all over its body. It’s sort of cool in a way, but the sad thing is this bass is actually a very early 1960s model, so I’m really curious to know what’s underneath the paint scheme. The neck, which I neglected to photograph, had new tuners and was modified for fretless play, but had its original nicotine-soaked finish.

Vendor Highlights

IMG_7094Out in full regalia was the table and offerings of our good friend Joe Riggio, a Tacoma luthier that builds the most breathtaking ‘50s and ‘60s F-style guitars I’ve ever seen. Not only are his neck and body shapes super authentic but fully customizable, his finishes are hands-down the most beautiful and right I’ve ever seen. Seriously, the quality and attention to vintage detail belies the true youth of his instruments, and if you ever get a chance to just touch them, you’d likely agree that there’s no way these are new guitars. They look, feel, sound and play far better than any relic you’ll run across, and if we ever start making our own brand of custom offsets, we’re gonna give this guy a call. He’s our favorite.

Also at the show was another of our favorite guitar finish gurus: Gord Miller. Say you had a 1950s Les Paul Jr. double-cut that was stripped and had a broken neck. If you brought such a guitar to us, of course we’d be happy to repair the neck, but when it comes to restoration, it’s Gord for us all the way. Seriously, his finishes aren’t your run-of-the-mill kind of relic job; with a dedication to authentic finish techniques, the right laquer colors and formulas, and dead-on wear and checking patterns, you’d be hard-pressed to tell his work apart from the real thing. Go to his website, which has a quiz of sorts on his website, begging you to guess which guitar pictured is a refin, a near impossible feat! Just check out that Les Paul Custom! He even had a display of vintage-correct colors sprayed on squares detailing the original look and his various levels of aging! Really impressive!IMG_7102

The most truly exciting discovery I made that day came by way of the proprietor of eBay store fenderparts, and let me tell you, I’m completely stoked over this guy’s work. He stopped by the table to congratulate us on our vinyl pickguards, asking questions and telling me how great the idea was. He mentioned that he made pickguards himself, and while I was interested I didn’t expect the level of work he was doing. He showed me his wares at his table, and in all honestly, I don’t think I’ll ever buy a guard from any one else, ever. Why? This man is fighting the good fight!

His guards are exactly the right color, shape and are cut with an attention to vintage detail that I just haven’t seen from other parts resources. His mint green ‘60s guards are the perfect color and has the correct middle black layer, and his tortoise shell is not only more beautiful than most repro guards, but they’re actually made of genuine celluloid sourced from Italy. Add to that the fact that his aging process – which he wouldn’t divulge – is both tasteful and produces a guard that’s a dead ringer for the real thing. Seriously, you honestly cannot find another retailer that’s doing it as right as fenderparts. If you didn’t know better, it would be hard to tell it apart from the real thing. I’ll be picking one up ASAP! And if fenderparts is reading this, I am SO sorry for forgetting your name. I’m the worst. I’ll be ordering my Jazzmaster guard very soon!

Shaking Hands and Kissing Babies, but not the Other Way Around

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Detail of the Stratocaster guard made by fenderparts, which you can find easily on eBay. Amazing stuff!

Look, honestly the reason we go to these guitar shows isn’t that we think we’re going to clean house and sell everything we bring; to think that way would be a total error of logic and purpose. The Guitar Show is really about connection with customers (we’ll call them new friends) and other vendors, and when that’s your criteria for success there’s no way you can lose. We made a lot of great connections throughout the day, gave out a bunch of business cards and price lists, and if that was it we’d be thrilled. Job well done, all of that.

Icing on the cake: we sold a few things, among which was the dreadnaught case we provided to the husband of the elevator attendant at the convention center, which was a great way to start the day. We also sold two very old parlor guitars (one from the 1880s and the other from 1920) to Mike McCready of Pearl Jam, and he couldn’t have been a nicer guy. And yes, we were all pretty excited to speak with him, especially Matt. We’re all big fans!

What a day. A 12+ hour day, but a great one nonetheless.

All in all, the 2013 Seattle-Tacoma Guitar Show was a lot of fun and we loved meeting all of you that came by the booth! Thanks for making us feel like the belle of the ball!

And to think, I didn’t hear “Smoke on the Water” even once…

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Gord Miller finish sample goodness!

– Michael James Adams

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